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Tuesday October 21st - 11:55pm

lacigreen:

internetdoashouting:

Bless your heart Joseph Fink.

ON POINT.

Via: misandry-mermaid Source: internetbooashouting

65,665 notes

Tuesday October 21st - 10:46pm

"

Unique taste — and the capacity to avoid the basic — is a privilege. A privilege of location (usually urban), of education (exposure to other cultures and locales), and of parentage (who would introduce and exalt other tastes). To summarize the groundbreaking work of theorist Pierre Bourdieu: We don’t choose our tastes so much as the micro-specifics of our class determine them. To consume and perform online in a basic way is thus to reflect a highly American, capitalist upbringing. Basic girls love the things they do because nearly every part of American commercial media has told them that they should.

Basics are good and steady consumers of good and steady American businesses, which is another way of saying they’re good Americans. But to look around and realize that all of our lofty ideals about the rights of the individual under democracy have in fact yielded a society in which “choice” — at least for a certain demographic — is the difference between two forms of scented body wash… well, that’s existentially terrifying.

Instead of grappling with the fundamental principles that have wrought this system, however, popular culture has transformed it into a way of disciplining the women who manifest it most vividly. To call someone “basic” is to look into the abyss of continually flattening capitalist dystopia and, instead of articulating and interrogating the fear, transform it into casual misogyny. And that’s a behavior far more troubling — and regressive — than taking pleasure in all things pumpkin spice.

"

17 notes

Tuesday October 21st - 5:11pm

stimutax:

70 Most Useful Sites on the Internet

Via: wretchedoftheearth Source: stimutax

39,302 notes

Tuesday October 21st - 1:49pm

regalia-of-wisdom:

bedlamsbard:

The difference between learning a modern language and an ancient language is that in first year French you learn “Where is the bathroom?” and “How do I get to the train station?” and in first year Attic Greek or Latin you learn “I have judged you worthy of death” and “The tyrant had everyone in the city killed.”

48,956 notes

Tuesday October 21st - 1:48pm

jessehimself:

It’s an old custom in the United Kingdom that when a visitor sees a money tree, he wedges in his own spare change. When you hammer in your coin, you make a wish. These trees are literally covered in the wishes of strangers. Most of the money trees are in Cumbria in West England and Portmeirion, along the Afon Glaslyn River in Wales. The tradition goes back to 18th century Scotland when florins were hammered into trees with a prayer to take away sickness.

text provided by http://www.wimp.com/oldtree/

Via: radfemgurl Source: jessehimself

1,283 notes

Tuesday October 21st - 1:43pm

only-one-cannoli:

bingedrunk:

when straight people talk to gays

Or how about when able-bodied people talk to disabled people because like stop using us as your metaphor please.

Via: radfemgurl Source: versaceslut

375,736 notes

Tuesday October 21st - 12:48am

"

…A young child born deaf in an indigenous North American nation grew up nearly always being able to communicate with her community. She would not be physically segregated. The expectation would be that if she survived the vagaries of life to which all were exposed, she could find and enjoy a partner, and she would eventually grow old as a treasured elder who tickled and guided the children around her. If all were in balance, she would find her gift—perhaps weaving, perhaps gathering particularly delicious herbs—and share that with her community, who would then share their gifts with her. A successful healing ceremony, if one was needed, would balance and resolve whatever unease might have existed—but certainly no one would expect the young girl to hear, for such a result was unnecessary.

Nearly every indigenous-language group used signed communication to some degree, and many nations shared singed languages despite their verbal difference. Europeans documented use of signed language among North American indigenous peoples as early as the sixteenth century, and anthropologists and linguists agree that it was employed long before contact with Europeans. Signed language has been identified within at least forty different language groups. Today, we know about indigenous signed languages because of its continued use by some elders, the anthropological work of scholars such as the Smithsonian’s Garrick Mallery in the late nineteenth century, films made by Hugh L. Scott in 1930 at the Indian Sign Language Council, and the tenacious scholarship and activism of contemporary linguists such as Jeffery E. Davis.

The most widely used signed language spread across an extensive region of the Great Plains, from Canada’s North Saskatchewan River to the Rio Grande, from the Rocky Mountain foothills to the Mississippi-Missouri valley. What is now referred to as Plains Indian Sign Language (PISL) enabled communication across communities regarding trade, in critical political negotiations, and even in courtship. Great Plains used this “signed lingua franca” as Davis has characterized it, within their communities as an alternative to spoken language for ritual or storytelling purposes—and of course as a primary language for deaf people and those around them.

"
A Disability History of America by Kim E. Nielsen, page 4 and 5 (via theaubisticagenda)

1,221 notes

Monday October 20th - 11:20pm

Anonymous ASKED: "That means that on average, trans women were raised with male privilege." Does this mean you agree that some trans women don't have male privilege, or at least not very much, such as passing early transitioners? Some start as early as 6 or 7 (or earlier) and while it's a different story whether this is morally acceptable or not, I just don't see how such early transitioners have male privilege in any meaningful way, even if they were born with a penis.

snowflakeespecial:

I hate hypotheticals because I don’t think they’re helpful in understanding the world. But here’s what I will say. When I watched the videos of transkid Jazz with her parents, I couldn’t help reading everyone’s behavior as “Look at how special our son is.” When little girls are celebrated, it’s usually because they’re behaving in a way that pleases everyone - think child beauty pageants, little girls doing gymnastics, etc. When boys are celebrated, it’s more likely because they’re different and unusual. As a culture, we celebrate outcast and outlier males because being an outlier is a male prerogative (think: the anti-hero, the lone wolf, the genius who failed algebra etc).

In contrast, when I’ve seen videos of ftm transkids, the parents seem to be doing a lot less celebration and a lot more justification. There’s a lot more focus on “my child is normal now” and a lot less of the “how special”.

And what I’m saying is that however you want to dress up what’s happening in the language of gender, a person born male is being celebrated for being exceptional and different, and a person born female is being normalized by claims that they are actually male. And when you look at it like that, it seems kind of like status-quo male privilege and status-quo sexism to me!

139 notes

Monday October 20th - 11:16pm

mediadiversified:

Brazil’s new primetime show “Sex and the Niggaz” serves the white gaze
by Blogueiras Negras
TV Channel Globo, one of the largest television networks in Brazil, is broadcasting a series called “Sexo e as Nega”. The series is an adaptation of Sex and the City, but this time with four Black actresses. The series has been written by the famous White actor, writer and producer Miguel Fallabella.
The very title of the series is itself hugely problematic, not only because race is the primary signifier of the women, but also because the terms are full of racist and gendered connotations, such as the venacular Brazilian expression “I’m not your niggaz “. In racist discourses, Black women are those who work for sex, while the white woman is the woman who is worthy of romantic love, kindness and respect. These same dualities are repeated in “Sexo e as Nega”, where the main character is a white woman who seeks love, while the black women live only for sex, which reminds us of another Brazilian expression which also has its roots in slavery and has remained practically unchanged – “White women are for marriage, mulatas are for fucking and black women are for work”.
View more: http://mediadiversified.org/2014/10/18/brazils-new-primetime-show-sex-and-the-niggaz-serves-the-white-gaze/

mediadiversified:

Brazil’s new primetime show “Sex and the Niggaz” serves the white gaze

by Blogueiras Negras

TV Channel Globo, one of the largest television networks in Brazil, is broadcasting a series called “Sexo e as Nega”. The series is an adaptation of Sex and the City, but this time with four Black actresses. The series has been written by the famous White actor, writer and producer Miguel Fallabella.

The very title of the series is itself hugely problematic, not only because race is the primary signifier of the women, but also because the terms are full of racist and gendered connotations, such as the venacular Brazilian expression “I’m not your niggaz “. In racist discourses, Black women are those who work for sex, while the white woman is the woman who is worthy of romantic love, kindness and respect. These same dualities are repeated in “Sexo e as Nega”, where the main character is a white woman who seeks love, while the black women live only for sex, which reminds us of another Brazilian expression which also has its roots in slavery and has remained practically unchanged – “White women are for marriage, mulatas are for fucking and black women are for work”.

View more: http://mediadiversified.org/2014/10/18/brazils-new-primetime-show-sex-and-the-niggaz-serves-the-white-gaze/

257 notes

Monday October 20th - 11:12pm

allthingseurope:

Stralsund, Germany (by SStefan Ganz)

allthingseurope:

Stralsund, Germany (by SStefan Ganz)

1,481 notes


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